Health tips and home remedies for psoriasis

HEALTH TIPS AND HOME REMEDIES FOR PSORIASIS

Health tips and home remedies for psoriasis

What is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune condition that causes the rapid development of skin cells. This buildup of skin cells causes scaling on top of the skin.
Inflammation and redness on and around the scales is very common. Distinctive psoriatic scales are whitish-silver and develop in thick, red patches. Sometimes, those patches may crack and bleed.
Psoriasis is due to sped-up skin cells production process. Characteristically, skin cells grow deep in the skin and slowly rise to the surface. Eventually, they dead and fall off. The average life cycle of a skin cell is one month. In people with psoriasis, skin cell production process may occur in just a few days. Because of this, skin cells do not have time to fall off. This rapid extra cell production leads to the buildup of skin cells.
Scales normally develop on joints, such elbows and knees. They can grow anywhere on the body, including the:
·hands
·feet
·neck
·scalp
·face
Rarest types of psoriasis affect the nails, the mouth, and the area around genitals.

Different types of psoriasis?
There are five types of psoriasis:

Plaque psoriasis

Plaque psoriasis is the very common type of psoriasis. Approximately about 80 percent of people with the condition have plaque psoriasis. It has red, inflamed patches that cover areas of the skin. These patches are regularly covered with whitish-silver scales or plaques. These patchy plaques are commonly found on the elbows, knees, and scalp.

Guttate psoriasis

Guttate psoriasis is often in childhood. This type of psoriasis causes minor pink spots. The very common sites for guttate psoriasis include the torso, arms, and legs. These spots are hardly thick or raised like plaque psoriasis.

Pustular psoriasis

Pustular psoriasis is very common in adults. It may causes white, pus-filled blisters and broad areas of red, inflamed skin. Pustular psoriasis is characteristically localized to smaller areas of the body, such as the hands or feet, but it may widespread.

Inverse psoriasis

Inverse psoriasis often causes on bright areas of red, shiny, inflamed skin. Patches of inverse psoriasis mostly develop under armpits or breasts, in the groin, or around skinfolds in the genitals.

Erythrodermic psoriasis

Erythrodermic psoriasis is a very severe and rare type of psoriasis. This form mostly covers large sections of the body at once. The skin almost appears sunburned. Scales that develop mostly slough off in large sections or sheets. It is common for a person with this type of psoriasis to run a fever or become ill. This type may be life-threatening, so individuals should see a doctor immediately.

What causes psoriasis?

Doctors are unclear as to what exactly causes psoriasis. However, thanks to decades of research, they have a general clue of two key factors: genetics and the immune system.

Immune system
Psoriasis is an autoimmune response condition. Autoimmune conditions are the result of the body attacking itself considering as defense mechanism. In the case of psoriasis, white blood cells known as T cells wrongly attack the skin cells.
In actual body, white blood cells are deployed to attack and destroy attacking bacteria and fight infections. This wrong immune attack causes the skin cell production process to go into overdrive. The sped-up skin cell production causes new skin cells to develop too fast. They are pushed to the skin’s surface, where they mass up.
This results in the plaques that are most usually associated with psoriasis. The attacks on the skin cells also result in red, inflamed areas of skin to develop.

Genetics
Some people have inherit genes that make them more likely to develop psoriasis. If you have blood relation family member with the skin condition, your risk for developing psoriasis is higher. However, the percentage of people who have psoriasis and a genetic predisposition is less. Approximately 2 to 3 percent of people with the gene develop the psoriasis condition           

What are the symptoms?

Psoriasis symptoms vary from person to person and rest on on the type of psoriasis. Areas of psoriasis may be as small as a few flakes on the scalp or elbow, or cover most of the body.
Common symptoms of plaque psoriasis include:
·         Red, raised, inflamed patches of skin
·         Whitish-silver scales or plaques on the red patches on skin
·         Dry skin that crack and bleed
·         Soreness around patches
·         Itching and burning sensations around patches
·         Thick, pitted nails
·         Painful, swollen joints
Not every person will experience all of the above symptoms. Some people will experience totally different symptoms if they have a less common type of psoriasis.
Most people with psoriasis experience “cycles” of symptoms. The condition may cause simple symptoms for a few days or weeks, and then the symptoms may clear up and be almost unremarkable. Then, in a few weeks or if made worse by a common psoriasis cause, the condition may flash up again. Sometimes, symptoms of psoriasis vanish completely.
When you have no active signs of the condition, you may be in “remission.” That does not mean psoriasis won’t reappear, but for now you are symptom free.

Health Tips for Psoriasis:

1. Use moisturizing lotions.
Indications get worse when your skin is dry, so keep skin moist with creams and lotions. Thick and oily ones, like petroleum jelly, are usually good. They are better at entrapping moisture beneath the skin cells. To help remove scales, apply cream on top of it, then cover the area with plastic wrap or another waterproof material. Leave it on for an hours, then remove it.

2. Take care of your skin and scalp. 
Be alert with your skin. Never pick or scratch at patches or scales, as you may make your psoriasis worse. Be cautious when trimming your nails. If you trim yourself, it might make symptoms flare. If you have psoriasis on your scalp, apply and rub your topical treatments -- such as tar shampoos -- into your scalp. Regular bathing with soothing products, like tar solutions, may bring relief, too.

3. Avoid dry, cold weather. 
Climate can have a huge effect on psoriasis. For many people, cold, dry weather aggravates symptoms. Hot weather usually makes it feel better, but not always.

4. Use a humidifier. 
It is important to keep your skin humidified. Turn on the humidifier when it is dry weather.
Avoid medications which cause flare-ups.
Let your physician know about all the medications you take, even over-the-counter ones. Ask him if they could affect your psoriasis.

5. Avoid scrapes, cuts, bumps, and infections.
 It is very important for people with psoriasis to avoid bumps and cuts. Injury to the skin can cause a flare, which called as "Koebner's phenomenon." Infections can also cause difficulties. Be especially careful when shaving and trimming. Don’t go for acupuncture, tattoos, and do your best to prevent insect bites and chafing.

6. Get some sun, but not too much. 
The ultraviolet rays in sunlight slow the development of skin cells, so getting moderate exposure of sun is good. But make it small exposure -- about 30 minutes or so at a time. And apply sunscreen on skin. Sunburn can also trigger psoriasis, and it increases your risk of skin cancer. Some medications can make your skin more delicate to ultraviolet rays, so talk to your physician  before starting any medication.


7. Reduce Your Stress
Stress can trigger a new outbreak and make  it worse. These stress reducing techniques won't replace your medicines, but they might make them work better:
  • Meditation: This focuses your attention to silent your mind. A few studies advise it can help with psoriasis when practiced along with traditional treatments.
  • Yoga: People practicing yoga to improve their health and relieve stress for thousands of years. If it helps you relax, it's worth a shot.
  • Massage: Be sure to let know your masseuse ahead of time about your psoriasis. Or find one who’s worked with people with psoriasis.

Home Remedies for Psoriasis:


1. Apple Cider Vinegar for Your Scalp
It is useful in treating Psoriasis. Pore some on your head 2 to 3 times a week -- either full strength or mixed with water. It gives relief when your feel to scratch scalp.
Rinse it off with water after it dries so you won't get an irritation. And please do not try this when your scalp is bleeding or cracked. The vinegar will make it feel like it is burning hot on head.

2. Put Dead Sea or Epsom salts Your Bath
If you want to shed some scales and soothe your skin, Put Dead Sea or Epsom salts into a bathing tub with warm water. Soak for about 15 minutes, and use a moisturizer when you are done to soak in the water.

3. Capsaicin
It is the ingredient that makes chili peppers feel hot, and so it got a place in your bag of tricks.  Researchers say it can cut pain due to its counterirritant property, reduce inflammation, and redness. You'll find it in over-the-counter creams at pharmacy store.
But ... Some users say it gives them a burning feeling when they put it on their scratched skin, so try on small part in small quantity and if u feel bearable go for it.

4. Turmeric
You might know it as the yellow herb powder that added in foods with a curry sauce. Studies show it may reduce your psoriasis flare-ups. You can try it as an ingredient in your food or as a supplement.

5. Tea Tree Oil
It is extracted from a plant that is native to Australia, but you do not have to go that way to get relief. Shampoos and body oil with tea tree oil  may help psoriasis on your scalp and skin.

6. Soak in Oats
It is a natural way to soothe your skin and irritation. Put some ground-up oats in your bath, sit back, and relax or you can apply oats paste on skin. Just make sure the water is warm, not hot, so you do not aggravate your psoriasis.

7. Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Omega-3 fatty acid fight inflammation, and you can find it in fish like salmon, mackerel, tuna, and sardines. You can also purchase fish oil supplements.
How much they help with psoriasis is not so clear, so get your physician’s advice.

8. Oregon Grape
It is an evergreen plant. It is also known as Mahonia aquifolium. Buy creams where it is 10% of the ingredients.

9. Planned Diet
This diet plan puts the focus on fish, veggies and fruits, and whole grains. A small study shows it might reduce your symptoms.

10. Aloe vera
Aloe vera have anti-inflammatory properties and helps decrease redness. Apply unscented gel or cream with 0.5% in it on your skin.


No comments:

Post a Comment

24 health tips and home remedies for cough

Health tips and Home Remedies  24 Health tips and Home Remedies for Cough What Is Cough? Coughs play an important role in remo...